Vicky Newham

What have I learnt from editing and revising my manuscript?

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Over the last three weeks I’ve been re-writing my first novel. With a particular and important goal in mind, I made the decision to re-write it until I was able to say ‘It’s finished for now’. It has been a fantastic experience, a brilliant learning opportunity and highly satisfying. It has also been intense and demanding.

On previous occasions I’d re-written lots of the chapters several times, and some of them a few times, sort of picking at it, I guess. So, I decided to start at the beginning and work systematically through each chapter. I will definitely do this next time.

One of the problems I encountered was that the story had evolved as I wrote the first draft, and this meant that with each significant change, I’d had to start the story again in a different structural place. When it came to the re-write, and deciding on that all-important first chapter, and the first 10,000 words, I needed to think hard. I tried to draw on what I’ve learnt on my MA, what I’ve observed successful authors doing in their books, plus, of course the creative writing theory.

When it came to re-writing the other 80,000 words, I decided to cull a large sub-plot. I think that this has been in the interests of the novel as a whole. There were two reasons for this, which I will cover in another blog post, but doing so cut my word count by 10,000 words. Initially this sent me into a panic, but I decided to hold my nerve and just keep re-writing.

As this is the longest piece of writing I have completed, I found that re-reading the story from start to finish was essential to having every little detail in my head. The Post-its on the wall and the mind maps were great, but I needed it in my head to have a sense of the whole. It was, however, very time-consuming to do this. I also wanted to make one set of revisions, print out the whole manuscript, read it through on paper and mark up further edits. I’ve always done this with academic pieces, and report-checking for school, and have found that it works for me. But, again, it’s very time-consuming and uses a lot of paper! As I’d seen authors on Twitter refer to the benefits of reading manuscripts on an e-reader (Cheers, Fiona! @fcmalby) I decided to try this. I found that I read more quickly on my Kindle, but I didn’t like having to then leaf through a printout to find the relevant page to mark up an edit. Perhaps this comes with practice. But I found it was a really good way to read my book through quickly to get a sense of how any major changes affected the overall story.

Something else I wanted to do was alternate interlinking plotlines as much as possible and found that this is very complex to organise. If ‘x’ is here doing something, he can’t be there doing something at the same time. Obvious, of course, but very fiddly to write and edit. I knew from my planning and timelines that the whole plot takes places in just over a week. When I wrote the first draft I used chapter headings and the navigation pane to help me to organise the story as it grew. I have decided to leave the chapter headings in for now, as I’ve seen them in other books with a non-linear narrative. Some of my MA peers said that they didn’t like not knowing ‘where’ and ‘when’ they ‘were’ at the start of a chapter, and some said they didn’t like being told! So I shall have to wait and see on that one, and see what advice I get.

Each time I marked up a set of edits on paper, it took me almost a day to make the required revisions in my document. Then it took me a day to read the whole thing through again, and mark up the next set. I did this three times, and then did a final proofreading. Each time I did it, I varied the font type and size, which helped to focus my attention. I’d love to know how other people go about this. Perhaps it is simply the case that it takes everyone a long time, and that one has to factor that into one’s schedule for deadline-meeting.

From starting this process to finishing it, I found that I got quicker at some aspects and slower at others. I got quicker at re-writing, and slower at reading and making revisions on the document. Psychologically, I can see how and why this would be the case. I also discovered, that the whole process took me longer than I’d envisaged, but this also wasn’t a major surprise (most things in life seem to!). Because I had a specific goal in mind, and a self-imposed target to meet, I had to go about it in a more intensive way than I would have liked. But what I’ve learnt is that a) I can write, re-write, edit and revise a novel, and b) I want to approach the re-writing of the next one in a more measured way.

Having submitted my novel yesterday to its destination, I couldn’t resist having another peek at it today on my Kindle. Guess what! Yep, a few typos, and I cringed and nearly wept with disappointment. However, I know from the tweets and blogposts of experienced writers on Twitter (Cheers Stav! @stavsherez and Julia! @thatjuliacrouch) that this is invariably the case, and is why ‘proper’ editing is essential. Whilst I’m saying thanks, a mention to Mel Sherratt (@writermels) for being an awesome sounding board.

Is my book “completely finished”? Nope. I am sure that it needs professional editing, hopefully through an agent or publisher, and will benefit hugely from this. What I am confident about, though, is that I have done the absolute best I could on it at the present moment. All in all, I feel that it’s a major achievement, and I have lots of learning to carry forward with me into novel number two! Has it put me off writing another novel? And wanting to be “a writer”. Absolutely not. It’s made me more determined and, in a strange way, has given me confidence. And whilst it felt a bit masochistic at times … I absolutely loved every minute of it!

Vicky Newham © 2013

Author: Vicky Newham

Vicky Newham is a writer, living in Whitstable, Kent. She writes crime fiction, psychological thrillers and science fiction. Her main projects are novels, but she also writes short stories, flash fiction, non-fiction articles and some poetry.

3 thoughts on “What have I learnt from editing and revising my manuscript?

  1. Pingback: How To Write Much Quicker – Update Your Website Quicker And Easier | Alun Hill Articles

  2. Pingback: How To Write Much Quicker - Update Your Website Quicker And Easier | Alun Hill

  3. Pingback: Diagnosing Your Manuscript’s Problems: Talking It Out | Page by page

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